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taiji:moy_lin-shin [2017/10/15 21:05]
serena
taiji:moy_lin-shin [2017/10/15 21:10] (current)
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 In conclusion, the actual art Mr. Moy taught is excellent. It is the organizational/​business aspects, low quality instructors,​ religious fanaticism, and administrators-for-life that have ruined it in my opinion. Only time will tell how Mr. Moy's legacy will play out. In conclusion, the actual art Mr. Moy taught is excellent. It is the organizational/​business aspects, low quality instructors,​ religious fanaticism, and administrators-for-life that have ruined it in my opinion. Only time will tell how Mr. Moy's legacy will play out.
 <​cite>​https://​www.reddit.com/​r/​taijiquan/​comments/​4guvhq/​taichi_taoist_is_worth/</​cite></​blockquote>​ <​cite>​https://​www.reddit.com/​r/​taijiquan/​comments/​4guvhq/​taichi_taoist_is_worth/</​cite></​blockquote>​
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 +== Wikipedia
 +As a sickly youth Moy was sent to a monastery. There he was trained in the teachings of the Earlier Heaven Wu-chi sect of the Hua Shan School of Taoism and regained his health. Moy reported that he studied the religious and philosophical side of Taoism and that he had acquired knowledge and skills in Chinese martial arts.
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 +Ahead of the Communist Revolution of 1949 Moy moved to Hong Kong. There he joined the Yuen Yuen Institute, in Tsuen Wan district in the New Territories,​ continued his education and became a Taoist monk.
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 +The Yuen Yuen Institute was established in 1950 by monks from Sanyuan Gong (Three Originals Palace) in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, which in turn traces its lineage to the Longmen (Dragon Gate) sect of Quanzhen (Complete Perfection) Taoism. The Yuen Yuen Institute is dedicated to Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism. In 1968, Moy co-founded, together with Taoist Masters Mui Ming-to and Mrs Tang Yuen Mei, the temple for the Fung Loy Kok Institute of Taoism (FLK; Penglai ge, 蓬萊閣) on the grounds of the Yuen Yuen Institute.[2]
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 +In addition to his studies and education in Taoism Moy Lin-shin learned a range of internal martial arts including Liuhebafa (Lok Hup Ba Fa, 六合八法 liùhé bā fǎ), T'ai Chi Ch'uan (太極拳 tàijí quán), Hsing I Ch'uan (形意拳 xíng Yì Quán), Bagua (Baguazhang,​ 八卦掌 bà guà zhǎng) and Taoist Qigong (chi kung, chi gung, 氣功 qìgōng). One of Moy's main teachers in Hong Kong was Leung Ji Pang (Liang Zi Peng, or Leung Ji Pang, 梁子鵬) (1900–1974),​ an instructor in Liuhebafa and other arts, who was in turn a student of Wu Yi Hui. Moy was taught Liuhebafa at the Chin Woo Athletic Association in Shanghai. Moy also trained in Hong Kong with Sun Dit, a fellow student of Liang Zhi Peng, who Moy said had developed skills in Hsing I Chuan and Push hands (押手 Yāshǒu).
taiji/moy_lin-shin.txt · Last modified: 2017/10/15 21:10 by serena